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Statement From The ACCC Regarding Solar Panels

Statement From The ACCC Regarding Solar Panels

Before purchasing solar power systems consumers should:

  • Obtain multiple quotes from different solar retailers to make sure they are getting the best deal possible
  • Be wary of unsolicited approaches from solar companies such as through door to door sales or by telemarketing
  • Only purchase or enter into a contract when you undertaken all necessary research and due diligence, including independent assessment of the financial benefits of the installation and the cost of the scheme
  • Checking that the solar retailer and installer are accredited by the Clean Energy Council (CEC). Accredited solar retailers or installers are required to meet industry best practice and safety standards in selling and installing the solar power system, and also check that they use accredited solar products.
  • Checking their own eligibility, and their service provider’s eligibility, for any Government solar incentive or subsidy schemes.
  • Be aware that retailers and installers may operate independently, find out what your rights are in relation to the sale and installation of the system.
  • Consumer should conduct their own independent research – check on the history and validity of the business – has it been operating in Australia for the past 5 years and review independent consumer reviews. If not, it may be a sign that the business has previously gone insolvent or is not to be trusted.
  • If consumers have concerns that something is wrong with their solar power system, they should first contact their retailer to discuss the remedies available to them. Under the Australian Consumer Law (ACL), consumers have automatic guarantee rights which entitle them to a remedy for faulty products. If a product does not meet the consumer guarantees, consumers are entitled to a remedy, which may include a repair, replacement or refund. These guarantees apply in addition to any warranty offered by the business.
  • If consumers cannot resolve their issue directly with the business, they can make a report to their local State or Territory consumer protection agency who may be able to provide guidance or conciliation to resolve the dispute.