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Bachelorette Art: A Critical Analysis

Welcome to the Insider Bachelor Art Hub – a place of learning, culture, and abs-tract discussions. This week we focus on the Woodennaissance movement.

This particular genre, heralded by masters such as Snezana, Heather and Lana, borrows techniques from many artistic traditions, such as Expressionism, Surrealism, and more. Let us analyse les oeuvres des Bachelorettes.

Heather (2015, charcoal, pencil on canvas)

Figure in the Reeds

The Bachelor Art Class Heather Snezana Nina Lana Artwork Analysis Fine Critique Criticism

Borrowing from impressionist masters such as Monet, Heather’s work represents a tremendous achievement in reconciling the Woodenaissance movement’s strong, accentuating lines with Impressionism’s softer approach. Excellent use of shading provides a dream-like tone to the tableau, signifying the veritable obsession Heather has with her mysterious subject. The face, cut off half way and shrouded by dense charcoal strokes, suggests a certain mystery to the man she depicts: who is he? What are his motivations? Where are his eyes looking? Such questions are shared by both artiste et public.

Lana (2015, charcoal, pencil on canvas)

The Half-Man

The Bachelor Art Class Heather Snezana Nina Lana Artwork Analysis Fine Critique Criticism

Lana’s work is immediately recognisable from her wispy, light strokes and surrealist leanings. Reminiscent of Dali, Lana’s floating torso throws the observer into a dreamscape where men have no legs and abs are square. The face of this figure seems slightly un-real – it is lacking a nose, has squiggly scars and a geometrically impossible smile. Lana lays her unconscious bare before the observer, thrusting a passive watcher into an emotional dream. We experience her angst: will this man be a definite presence in her life, or will he only be half-there?

Sarah (2015, charcoal on canvas)

The Smoulder

The Bachelor Art Class Heather Snezana Nina Lana Artwork Analysis Fine Critique Criticism

A homage to German Expressionist Edvard Munch’s famous work The Scream, The Smoulder stands apart from other works in this collection by its strong, dense lines and complicated layering. The depiction of the subject’s biceps is the best example of this – countless downward charcoal strokes that create depth and definition. But the focus of the painting is the face: heavily stubbled, downcast eyes, and a peculiar expression that one can only assume is ‘The Smoulder.’ Heavy shading around the chest have given this portrait the alternative title of ‘The Woodenaissance Mona Lisa’ – the pecs seem to follow you as you move around the room.

Snezana and Nina (2015, clay sculpture)

David on the Lounge

The Bachelor Art Class Heather Snezana Nina Lana Artwork Analysis Fine Critique Criticism

Bravo! Bravo! Snezana and Nina’s David on the Lounge is a brilliant, cerebral, postmodern answer to Michelangelo’s David. Traditional depictions of masculinity (large biceps, broad shoulders, chiselled six-pack) are challenged by a disproportionally thin right leg, lack of hands (symbolising powerlessness) and a feminine love heart inscribed on the lounge the figure lies upon. Again, the theme of mystery and allure is present in this work. The head has a disturbing lack of face, but the relaxed, almost sensual position of the figure invites us to investigate the mystery. This work of Woodenaissance is truly a tour de force.